L.O. Todd Collection

MUM00770

PURL

http://purl.oclc.org/umarchives/MUM00770/

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Summary Information

Repository
University of Mississippi Libraries
Title
L.O. Todd Collection
ID
MUM00770
Date [inclusive]
1934-2017
Extent
2 boxes
Language of Materials
English
Abstract
Collection of speeches, correspondence, and newspaper articles from and about L.O. Todd concerning the MEA [Mississippi Education Association], the USSR, and integration of public schools in Meridian, Mississippi.

Preferred Citation

L.O. Todd Collection (MUM00770), Archives and Special Collections, J.D. Williams Library, The University of Mississippi

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Biographical Note

Lindsey Todd was born in Newton County, Mississippi. He enrolled at the University of Mississippi in 1919 but was unable to return after his sophomore year because of his father's terminal illness. He accepted a job as principal of a school in western Kemper County, beginning a 49-year career as a school administrator. During summer sessions, he completed his education, earning a bachelor's degree from George Peabody College for Teachers, a master's degree from Columbia University Teachers College and a Ph.D. from Peabody. His doctorate was the second in the state earned by a Mississippi public school administrator. After serving in Kemper County, Todd went on to be superintendent of schools at Collins and Philadelphia. He served as president of East Central Community College for 19 years, and later as the superintendent of the Meridian Public Schools, including Meridian Community College, for 18 years. Todd served as president of the Mississippi Education Association in 1945. He was a founder of the Mississippi Association of School Administrators in the early 1930s and served as the second president of the association. After World War II, Todd acted as a consultant to several states developing community college systems. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and the American Association of School Administrators honored him with distinguished service recognition. In 1964, he was one of a few selected superintendents to visit the Soviet Union and examine their education system. In 1970, Todd oversaw the desegregation of Meridian Public Schools. He held several meetings with teachers, students, and community organizations to make sure the process went as smoothly as possible. Todd retired in 1971. He died in 1973.

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Scope and Content

The collection contains photographs, brochures, newspaper articles, notebooks, speeches, correspondence, and note cards of individuals, events, and scenes relating to and by Dr. L.O. Todd.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

University of Mississippi Libraries 2018

Copyright Restrictions

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted material. Under certain conditions specified in the law, libraries and archives are authorized to furnish a photocopy or other reproduction. One of these specified conditions is that the photocopy or reproduction is not to be "used for any purpose other than private study, scholarship or research." If a user makes a request for, or later uses, a photocopy or reproduction for purposes in excess of "fair use," that user may be liable for copyright infringement.

Additions

No further additions are expected to this collection.

Acquisition Information

Joseph C. Todd

Processing Information

Collection processed by Amanda M. Williams, January 2017. Finding aid encoded by Amanda M. Williams, February 2017.

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Controlled Access Headings

Subject(s)

  • Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
  • Education –- Mississippi
  • Mississippi Education Association
  • Segregation in higher education -- Mississippi
  • Universities and colleges -- Southern States

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Collection Inventory

Box 1 

1.1 L.O. Todd’s Changes in Curriculum for ECJC, 1934-1936 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s report of “Significant Changes in the Curriculum of the East Central Junior College – 1934-1936.” Note on Original Folder: Progress report 1934 – 1936. First two years at ECJC – depth of Great Depression

1.2 L.O. Todd’s Life Story until 1936 

Scope and Content

7pgs. L.O. Todd’s educational life story until 1936. Note on Original Folder: Interesting personal story. Reason, possibly to do with graduate study at Peabody College.

1.3 L.O. Todd speech to MEA, 15 April 1938 

Scope and Content

10pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech to social science section of MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] [Mississippi Education Association] in Jackson, Mississippi. The speech discusses social studies program in high schools and junior colleges. The speech is summarized in L.O. Todd’s handwriting on stationary from the Robert E. Lee hotel in Jackson, Mississippi.

1.4 Speech by Mr. W.C. Mabry, 1938 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Mr. Mabry discusses how too much attention has been given to endowments or high tax assessments for the support of high schools and colleges. He goes on to say how the 30 members of the board of trustees work in harmony. Note on Original Folder: Speech by Mr. W.C. Mabry, president of Board Trustees of East Central Junior College before the faculty and student body following ECJC becoming accredited by the Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. 1938. L.O. Todd, attending George Peabody College in Nashville had traveled to Memphis in the summer of 1938 to present the data seeking accreditation. He was told that ECJC was accredited. He wrote this news in 2 letters on Peabody Hotel stationary on the train back to Nashville. He instructed my mother not to announce the good news but go down to Newton and tell one very special man. Mr. Mabry was the primary person responsible for L.O. Todd leaving his good job in Philadelphia and coming to the new and struggling college in his home county. Dr. Harold Graham, noted historian of Newton County, in a conversation with me (Joe Todd), that he felt Mr. Mabry was the most outstanding citizen of the county in the 20th century. I am sure L.O. Todd would agree with Harold.

1.5 L.O. Todd American Association of Junior College, 29 February – 2 March 1940 

Scope and Content

9pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “The Problem of Adequately Trained Teachers in Junior Colleges” was for the American Association of Junior College in Columbia, Missouri. He discusses the education of teachers and how it affects their curriculum. He also discusses how important teachers were to junior colleges and some of the problems of junior colleges. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd was the only Mississippian on the program.

1.6 L.O. Todd Speech to Rotarian, 1942 

Scope and Content

14pgs. L.O. Todd’s to the Rotarian club. No date. It is a portion of a speech to Rotarian. The speech discusses American and Rotarian values and promoting the role of education. Note on Original Folder: Speech was not in 1942 when he was district (MS and Louisiana) governor. It certainly post-WWII: Cold War rhetoric.

1.7 L.O. Todd’s U of MS Commencement Address, 17 September 1943 

Scope and Content

16pgs. L.O. Todd’s commencement speech for University of Mississippi’s summer session commencement at Fulton Chapel. A program is also included.

1.8 J. Todd’s Guide to Papers of L.O. Todd 1944-47 

Scope and Content

20pgs. J. Todd, L.O. Todd’s son, created a guide to L.O. Todd’s papers from the years 1944-1947. He includes an introduction, history of the MEA, key players, what policies and problems occurred, as well as relevant history from 1944-1947. He also includes photocopies of several relevant documents.

1.9 L.O. Todd’s Qualifications for MEA Vice President, March 1944 

Scope and Content

1pg. A list of education, teaching, and professional and community services in regards to his qualification for the vice president of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION].

1.10 Letters of Support for L.O. Todd, March 1944 

Scope and Content

47pgs. Letters that support L.O. Todd’s candidacy for the position of vice president for the Mississippi Education Association. Several prominent educators supported L.O. Todd, including University of Mississippi Chancellor Alfred Hume and Forrest Murphy who became the Chairman of Department of Education at the University of Mississippi.

1.11 L.O. Todd Vice President MEA, March - April 1944 

Scope and Content

15pgs. Correspondence congratulating L.O. Todd being asked and elected for vice president of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION]. Floyd Barnes was elected executive secretary the same time and year Todd was elected vice president. Newspaper article discussing Todd’s appointment as vice president.

1.12 Teacher Retirement Law, March 1944 

Scope and Content

28pgs. The MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] financial report for 1944 and a proposed budget for the 1944-1945 year. Two MEA issued booklets of the “Teacher Retirement Law” for their annual meeting. W.N. Taylor, retiring MEA Executive Secretary, gave an analysis of the teacher retirement law.

1.13 Homestead Exemption Committee, May – June 1944 

Scope and Content

8pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and several other educational leaders in the Mississippi Education Association to discuss a MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] study on the operation of the Homestead Exemption law as it applies to the schools of Mississippi.

1.14 L.O. Todd Speech to Teachers of Fifth Congressional District, 21 November 1944 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech to teachers of the Fifth Congressional District. He also discusses education and World War II. An annotation in L.O. Todd’s handwriting indicates the speech was delivered on radio.

1.15 Executive Secretary of MEA Letter to Legislature, 15 January 1945 

Scope and Content

1 pg. Executive Secretary of MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] wrote to the Mississippi Legislature about the professional improvement of its members and the advancement of the educational interests of the state. Note on Original Folder: Executive Secretary of MEA (new on the job) letter to members of Mississippi Legislature. Floyd Barnes explains his lack of experience in dealing directly with the legislature. He had the good fortune of having Fred Young, the immediate past president and chairman of the legislature committee, and L.O. Todd the vice president (president elect) as his closest male associates at his new job. Both were experienced and skilled at working with legislators.

1.16 MEA Convention Postponed, 5 February 1945 

Scope and Content

1pg. Board of Directors letter detailed the indefinite postponement of the 1945 MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] convention on orders of the War Committee on Conventions, Washington D.C.. Note on Original Folder: Announcement that the War Committee on conventions would not allow the March MEA annual convention citing transportation and housing shortages.

1.17 Answering Questions in the Study of MS Program of Higher Education, 4 April 1945 

Scope and Content

9pgs. The “Statements in Answer to Questions in the Study of Mississippi’s Program of Higher Education” gives statements along the lines of the five questions stated in a letter of 1 March 1945. Note on Original Folder: Statement concerning higher education. Author not listed, but statement on page six citing experience at East Central Junior College confirms that L.O. Todd is the author.

1.18 MEA Board of Directors Minutes, 5 April 1945 

Scope and Content

3pgs. The minutes of meeting of Board of Directors of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION]. The last page of the document has Mrs. Grace Nelson resigning as president of the MEA, and L.O. Todd being elected as the new president. Note on Original Folder: The March Convention had been cancelled and the traditional change in officers had not occurred. Mrs. Nelson resigned and L.O. Todd, the vice president, in keeping with tradition was nominated and elevated to office of president.

1.19 Congratulatory Letters to L.O. Todd, April 1945 

Scope and Content

14pgs. Letters to L.O. Todd congratulating him on his promotion to the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] president.

1.20 MEA Board of Directors Minutes, 4 May 1945 

Scope and Content

3pgs. The minutes of Board of Directors of the Mississippi Education Association. The main topic of discussion was the letter from Secretary Givens of the N.E.A. to inform the secretary that Mississippi already adopted in principle the five-year program of unification, expansion, and development. Note on Original Folder: This is the first mention in writing that Joseph Todd found that mentions what would become the “Unified Plan.”

1.21 Fact Finding Commission Meeting, May-July 1945 

Scope and Content

17 pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and several individuals asking them to attend the meeting of the “Fact Finding Commission” of the Mississippi Education Association to work on developing plan for legislative program. The “Fact Finding Commission” would be renamed the “Educational Policies Commission.” It would create the “Unified Plan.”

1.22 Report of Educational Policy Committee, 5 June 1945 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Delta Council’s “Report of Educational Policy Committee” discusses the Senate Bill 619, which has for its purpose the enlargement of vocational education in Mississippi and to make recommendations regarding African American education in Mississippi. Note on Original Folder: The subcommittee that met on June 5 included: 1.Senator Kyle – Chairman of Joint Legislation Committee for Education 2.Walter Sillers – Speaker of House of Representatives 3.Fred Young – past President of Mississippi Education Association and Chairman of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] Education Policy Committee.

1.23 MEA Board of Directors Minutes, 22 June 1945 

Scope and Content

4pgs. The second page of the minutes discusses regional meetings for the fall and officers are instructed to form committees to study the problems of African American education, strengthening the State Department Board of Education, teacher retirement law, homestead exception law, colleges, state owned text books, compulsory school attendance law, and common school appropriations.Note on Original Folder: 1.First indication that a broad based program was being planned for the 1945-46 MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] year. 2.Deliberation of the “scope” of activities to be studied. 8 are listed. Motion made that President (Todd), Secretary (Barnes), and President Chairman of Legislation Committee (Young) be delegated the responsibility of naming subcommittees. 3.Suggestion that since a fall MEA convention would not be permitted, a series of regional meetings be considered.

1.24 Joint Legislative Education Committee Minutes, 28 June 1945 

Scope and Content

2pgs. The “Extract from Minutes of Joint Legislative Education Committee” discusses the proposed recommendations that were tentatively approved by the committee.Note on Original Folder: This is Senator Kyle’s committee. This committee is seen to be pushing the educators to come up with support for what they want to accomplish.The handwriting in the margin pointing to item one is typical of Floyd Barnes. He was forwarding this to L.O. Todd.

1.25 Title of Committees and Scope of Activities, 3 July 1945 

Scope and Content

7pgs. A report detailing the eleven various subcommittees, their specific purposes, and their members. Handwritten note from Executive Secretary Barnes to President L.O. Todd.

1.26 Immediate Plans and Policies of the MEA, 3 July 1945 

Scope and Content

20pgs. Twenty copies of the “General Statement Relative to Immediate Plans and Policies of the Mississippi Education Association.” The officers of the Mississippi Education Association determined the following policies to develop a coordinated, unified program in cooperation with various educational groups and state agencies and detailing the major problems in developing a desirable educational program. There were eleven problems to be studied. Note on Original Folder: This is the “Unified Plan.” Fact Finding Committee officially replaced by the “Educational Policies Commission.” The deadline for the committee reports is given as September 10. This is in line with request from Senator Kyle’s Legislative Committee, and also association’s plan to present to teachers at regional meeting in the fall. Joe Todd note: This is a carefully selected committee and it is no surprise to me that Fred Young, one of L.O. Todd’s most admired and trusted fellow educator, was named as the Committee Chairman.

1.27 Executive Secretary Barnes Letter to L.O. Todd, 6 July 1945 

Scope and Content

1pg. Mississippi Education Association Floyd Barnes to L.O. Todd. He discusses how all of the July 3 documents and letters had been sent. Mr. Barnes was also leaving for two weeks and left a forwarding address for the University of Chicago.

1.28 L.O. Todd Letter to Executive Secretary Barnes, 12 July 1945 

Scope and Content

1pg. L.O. Todd wrote to Executive Secretary Barnes. He discusses his trip to the University of Texas and how he discovered the Texas Education Association was divided on issues.

1.29 Educational Policies Commission, July 1945 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Correspondence relating to appointing the chairman of the Educational Policies Commission and the commission’s first meeting.

1.30 Report on Negro Education, July 1945 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Correspondence between A.H. Ramsay, Dr. H.M. Ivy, and L.O. Todd discussing reports relating to African American education.

1.31 Letters to Mr. Cain, July-August 1945 

Scope and Content

3pgs. Two letters L.O. Todd sent to Mr. Cain at the State Department of Education. In one letter, L.O. Todd discusses the Fact Finding Committee, teacher’s salaries, and the investigation to the number and quality of teachers in Mississippi. In the other letter L.O. Todd discusses the need for data on teacher shortages to show the state legislature.

1.32 Strengthening the Office of County Superintendents, July-August 1945 

Scope and Content

13pgs. Correspondence and a draft of a report of the special commission of “Strengthening the Office of County Superintendents.”

1.33 Educational Policies Commission, 8-16 August 1945 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Letter from Senator Kyle to L.O. Todd. The chairman of the Joint Legislative Committee on Education complementing the Mississippi Education Association for its study groups and interest in the reports. Fred Young, chairman of the Education Policies Commission telling the commission and the study committees to submit the reports to Senator Kyle’s committee by September 1. L.O. Todd’s letter to same education commission that Fred Young addressed, relating Senator Kyle’s interest and urgency of completing reports. Fred Young’s letter to L.O. Todd also emphasized to get studies done and submitted to Senator Kyle.

1.34 Fred Young Letter to L.O. Todd, 16 August 1945 

Scope and Content

1pg. Fred Young wrote to L.O. Todd and discussed several committees and programs they were working on.

1.35 Textbook System Study, 18 August 1945 

Scope and Content

3pgs. A letter to L.O. Todd, now the President of the Mississippi Education Association, regarding his textbook system study report. This letter discusses the board’s decisions and discussions of the deficiencies of six different topics.

1.36 Correspondence MEA Board of Directors and Educational Policies, 22-30 August 1945 

Scope and Content

5pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd, Floyd Barnes, Mr. Smith, and Senator Kyle. They discussed the Board of Directors of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] and the Educational Policies Commission.

1.37 Howard Dawson and L.O. Todd Correspondence, August - September 1945 

Scope and Content

5pgs. Correspondence between Howard Dawson, the Director of Rural Services, and L.O. Todd. Todd was asking for data to present to the state legislature.

1.38 Letters to Select Superintendents, 8 September 1945 

Scope and Content

23pgs. Letters from L.O. Todd to select superintendents around Mississippi to discuss the deteriorating supply and quality of teachers in schools. Note on Original Folder: Sent to selected county superintendents of education and district superintendents to take part in canvassing every school in their county, using questionnaires prepared to document the deteriorating supply and quality of teacher in the public schools. Asked that report be made within three weeks – to report to Senator Kyle’s Joint Legislative Committee.

1.39 L.O. Todd Speech at Delta State Teacher College, 12 September 1945 

Scope and Content

18pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at Delta State Teacher College. He discusses economic well-being, the ability of men to govern themselves, and ideas of justice and human decency. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd was president of MEA at the time of the speech. This speech was given one month after Hiroshima – and of end of war.

1.40 Correspondence between L.O. Todd and Fred Young, 17-19 September 1945 

Scope and Content

3pgs. An exchange of letters between L.O. Todd and Fred Young. Note on Original Folder: The letter illustrates why L.O. Todd admired Fred Young and trusted his judgment.

1.41 Correspondence before State Legislature Meeting, September-October 1945 

Scope and Content

38pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and several individuals relating to Mississippi education, budgets, and committee reports before state legislature meeting.

1.42 Regional Meetings of MEA Correspondence, September – October 1945 

Scope and Content

55 pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd, Henry Hill, Floyd Barnes, and several others discussing regional meetings of Mississippi Education Association. Note on Original Folder: Henry Hill – new president of George Peabody College for Teachers.

1.43 MEA Correspondence, September – December 1945 

Scope and Content

26pgs. Correspondence relating to the Mississippi Education Association, legislative committee, National Child Labor Committee, and various bills proposed relating to education. L.O. Todd and Governor Tom Bailey also discussed a possible commission for Mississippi Public School Centennial.

1.44 L.O. Todd Note Cards and Report to MEA, 12-15 November 1945 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Copies of L.O. Todd’s note cards used for his speech at eight regional meetings of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION]. Copy of a report that was a summary of the message that the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] was trying to convey at the regional meetings. The topics and data in the report correspond to L.O. Todd’s note cards and speech.

1.45 Regional Meetings of MEA, 12 – 15 November 1945 

Scope and Content

22 pgs. The announcements, budgets, and notecards relate to the regional meetings of the Mississippi Education Association. Note on Original Folder: Regional Meetings of MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION], November 12-15, 1945. 1. Schedule, locations, purpose, and program plan. 2. President L.O. Todd speech, text, and note cards.

1.46 Newspaper Articles of Regional Meetings of MEA, November 1945 

Scope and Content

20pgs. The newspaper articles discuss the regional meetings of the Mississippi Education Association.

1.47 L.O. Todd speech on MEA Policies to Mississippi Association of School Administrators, 28 December 1945 

Scope and Content

28 pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech on Mississippi Education Association Policies. He mentions three main policies. First, Mississippi was trying to develop a unifying program. Second, the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] policies are developed on a thorough study of the whole field of education and attention is being given to the most pressing problems. Last, it is a guide to help gain members and support for the association. He also calls for the legislature to improve the facilities in junior colleges since he said they had the majority of technical-vocational programs. He also discusses education for African American citizens and how more teachers are needed as well as the content of the curriculum. He closes the speech with a quote from the The Economic Bias of Politics by Charles A. Beard. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd address to Ms. Assn. Sch. Adms. Dec 28, 1945. Summary of MEA activities for the year closed the speech quotation from The Economic Bias of Politics, by Charles A. Beard (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1945), p. 3.

1.48 Senator Kyle’s Memorandum, 1945 

Scope and Content

5pgs. This is an unfinished copy of Senator Kyle’s memorandum discussing the program of vocational education. The memorandum has two notes on the top of the first page. The first note in pencil specifically says “This is not final and is unfinished – Livingston.” The second note in blue pen is by L.O. Todd. Note on Original Folder: Livingston may be a member of Senator Kyle’s committee.

1.49 MEA and Legislative Activity, 1945-1946 

Scope and Content

13pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and Mrs. Jones. Mrs. Jones was L.O. Todd’s successor as President of the Mississippi Education Association (1946-1947). There is a copy of the 1946-1948 budget to the Members of Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning. There is a copy of a “Summary of the Main Legislative Enactments Pertaining to Negro Education in Mississippi.”

1.50 L.O. Todd’s Address to MSCW, 7 January 1946 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s address to students and faculty at Mississippi State College for Women (MSCW). Fifteen months after end World War II, he discusses patriotism, value of education, philosophy of democracy, and the urge to teach.

1.51 L.O. Todd Letter to Senator Kyle, 16 January 1946 

Scope and Content

4pgs. L.O. Todd letter to Senator Kyle discussing the trainees in vocational training program and the pressures that junior colleges were experiencing. Note on Original Folder: Todd letter to Senator Kyle. This letter expresses the pressure at every junior and senior college – early discharges as World War II was winding down. Long serving troops from Europe were being discharged rather than being sent to Asia for the expected invasion of Japan.

1.52 L.O. Todd and Mr. Daniels Correspondence, 27-28 January 1946 

Scope and Content

3pgs. Correspondence L.O. Todd and Mr. Daniels. Mr. Daniels was the superintendent of New Albany schools at this time. Note on Original Folder: Like Fred Young, Mr. Daniel had served as President of MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] and his experience, integrity, and judgment were needed at critical times.

1.53 L.O. Todd Letters, January- February 1946 

Scope and Content

14pgs. Several letters by L.O. Todd to various persons.

1.54 L.O. Todd to President Truman, January-February 1946 

Scope and Content

3pgs. L.O. Todd wrote to President Truman approving Truman’s statement with relation to federal aid to education and federal aid for school buildings. William D. Hassett, the Secretary to the President, responded to L.O. Todd’s letter. Note on the Folder: State of the Union address 1946. A Mississippian favoring federal aid for education, what about local control?

1.55 Correspondence About Teachers and Budgets, January – February 1946 

Scope and Content

8pgs. Correspondence and reports regarding the number of teachers per subject and budgets for schools and administration.

1.56 1946 Preconvention Correspondence for MEA, January – March 1946 

Scope and Content

61pgs. Correspondence sent by L.O. Todd for the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] convention. Packet of responses to letter from L.O. Todd on March 4, 1946 requesting committee appointment and duties related to March MEA convention.

1.57 Letters to Chairmen of School Sections of MEA, 1-2 February 1946 

Scope and Content

10pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and letters to chairmen of school sections of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] regarding preparation for March annual convention.

1.58 L.O. Todd and Mr. Ramsey Correspondence, 6-9 February 1946 

Scope and Content

3pgs. L.O. Todd and Mr. Ramsey correspondence regarding preparation for March annual convention. Mr. Ramsey was chairman of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] Legislature liaison committee.

1.59 Presidential Address, MEA Convention, 15-16 March 1946 

Scope and Content

102 pgs. L.O. Todd's Presential Address to the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION]. L.O. Todd’s MEA speech discussed Mississippi’s activities and improvements to be made in the past, present, and future. Two copies of Mississippi’s constitution and by-laws pamphlets.

1.60 “How One College Serves Five Counties,” March 1946 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Two photocopies of L.O. Todd’s article “How One College Serves Five Counties” for Junior College Journal. L.O. Todd published in 1946 – illustrates his conviction that junior (community) college were uniquely positioned, not just for traditional education function, but to play a role in social, economic, and cultural advancement – especially in rural areas.

1.61 Newspaper Articles about the MEA Convention, March 1946 

Scope and Content

31pgs. Newspaper articles relating to the 1946 MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] Convention.

1.62 Post MEA Convention Correspondence, March – May 1946 

Scope and Content

16pgs. Correspondence after the Mississippi Education Association Convention in March 1946. Much of this correspondence relates to improving membership of the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION]. There is also a list of board directors, commissars, and committees of the MEA. Note on Original Folder: Last document in this folder – May 23, 1946 – list of Board of Directors, Commissars, and Committees of MEA for 1946-1947. Note L.O. Todd is the 3rd ranked officer on Board of Directors as the immediate past president. Page 3, The Problem and Policies Commission is listed. This commission was created in 1945 by L.O. Todd for purpose detailed on this page. The commission was made permanent at 1946 meeting and L.O. Todd served as co-chairman with Forrest Magehee. This was a powerful position planning for special sessions of legislature in 1947.

1.63 Correspondence to L.O. Todd, March – July 1946 

Scope and Content

24pgs. Correspondence to L.O. Todd congratulating him on his term of Mississippi Education Association president as well as getting funds for schools, colleges, and universities.

1.64 1946 Legislative Session Correspondence, April 1946 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and key members from the Mississippi Senate and House of Representatives regarding the 1946 legislative session. Notes in Folder: Mr. Williams was a member of legislature – owner of a wholesale grocery business in McComb. L.O. Todd thanking the educators who contributed so much to the successful legislative program.

1.65 L.O. Todd Letter to Floyd C. Barnes, 25 June 1946 

Scope and Content

1pg. Letter from L.O. Todd to Floyd C. Barnes, the Executive Secretary for the Mississippi Educational Association. He discusses his admiration for Barnes and his recent experience as president for the Mississippi Educational Association.

1.66 Compulsory School Attendance Bill S. 173, 30 June 1946 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Compulsory schools attendance bill. The first page is calling for support of the bill from Mississippi senators and representatives.

1.67 1946 Plans for Legislative Session Correspondence 

Scope and Content

41pgs. Correspondence and communication regarding plans for programs to be presented to a possible special session of Legislature in 1947. Note on Original Folder: a) Nov. 5 letter L.O. Todd to co-chairman Magehee listing suggestions; b) Nov. 8 letter L.O. Todd to Barnes, Executive Secretary with plans for data collection on teacher shortage, qualification, etc. in Mississippi. Sample questionnaires. Note: Todd and Magehee are pursuing Problems and Policies Commission issues left over from 1945-46. Mrs. Jones, President, is pursuing teacher certification issues.

1.68 Legislation Reports Newspaper Articles, 1946 

Scope and Content

10pgs. Newspaper articles about the Mississippi Legislation reports.

1.69 L.O. Todd and J.M. Tubb, January 1947 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and J.M. Tubb, the State Superintendent of Education. They are discussing a budget to be proposed to the governor and state legislature.

1.70 Preparing for Special Legislature Meeting, January 1947 

Scope and Content

18pgs. Correspondence and notes in preparation for the special state legislature meeting about teacher shortages.

1.71 Reports to Problem and Policies Commission, January 1947 

Scope and Content

39pgs. Correspondence between committee members. Committee members submitted their regional reports for the Problem and Policies Commission. L.O. Todd was a chairman of this committee.

1.72 Statements on Teacher Shortages and Plights of Schools, January - February 1947 

Scope and Content

17pgs. Copy of the Leader’s Letter and front page discusses the shortages of teachers. L.O. Todd sent letter to commission member with “Suggest Statement” regarding data on teacher shortage. L.O. Todd wrote a statement entitled “The Plight of the Schools.” There are the minutes from the Problems and Policies Commission Meeting. President Jones sent a letter to Governor Wright that summarized data from research regarding teachers.

1.73 Junior College Heads Letter, 28 February 1947 

Scope and Content

1pg. L.O. Todd letter to “The Junior College Heads” reporting on a meeting the previous day with Governor Wright regarding issues of important to be considered in the state legislature’s special session, including $200,000 for junior colleges.

1.74 Minimum Salary Report, February 1947 

Scope and Content

4pgs. A tentative report for the minimum salary proposals for the legislative program of 1948.

1.75 L.O. Todd’s Letter to President Jones, 19 March 1947 

Scope and Content

2pgs. L.O. Todd wrote to MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] President Jones regarding a report of the special session of the state legislature.

1.76 Post Convention Floyd Barnes Letter, March 1947 

Scope and Content

3pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and Floyd Barnes after the MEA [MISSISSIPPI EDUCATION ASSOCIATION] 1947 convention. Barnes handwrote several notes in the margins and heading of a letter to the board of directors of the MEA.

1.77 L.O. Todd Survey of Legislation in MS, 25 February 1949 

Scope and Content

9pgs. L.O. Todd’s survey and relation of legislation in Mississippi read at San Francisco. Note on Original Folder: I remember my father and mother making the trip to San Francisco in 1949. The name of the conference is not given but it was held at Mark Hopkins Hotel. He evidently is reporting on a survey and its relation to MS legislation. It is a good synopsis of creation and evolution of MS junior colleges.

1.78 Mississippi Legislation Charts a Comprehensive Program, January 1951 

Scope and Content

6pgs. Two copies of an article “Mississippi Legislation Charts a Comprehensive Program” for the Junior College Journal for January 1951. L.O. Todd discussing passage of a comprehensive statue “that covers the entire range of junior college interest.”

1.79 Autobiography of Horace Macaulay Ivy, 1952 

Scope and Content

71pgs. Bound copy of autobiography of Horace Macaulay Ivy, Superintendent Emeritus Meridian Public Schools.

1.80 L.O. Todd’s speech to the General Faculty Meeting, 10 September 1953 

Scope and Content

6pgs. Speech to L.O. Todd’s first faculty meeting as superintendent. He wanted to emphasize the improvement of instruction. He discussed three particular approaches to improvement of instruction: 1) methods, 2) curriculum, and 3) the study of human growth and development.

1.81 L.O. Todd Speech Notecards 1953-1959 

Scope and Content

77pgs. L.O. Todd notecards for graduation, radio, and television speeches. Speech topics included education, promoting adult education, retirement, and Cold War.

1.82 L.O. Todd’s speech for MS Business Education Association, 31 October 1954 

Scope and Content

13pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “A Superintendent’s Viewpoint of a Good Business Educational Program” was given at the fall conference of Mississippi Business Education Association. He discusses the education of students in secondary schools and colleges of preparing students to be successful citizens, understanding of business principles, procedures, and understanding.

1.83 L.O. Todd Speech Optimist Club, 6 November 1956 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s “The Schools and Democracy” speech to the Optimist Club. He discusses what constitutes a good citizen and how education can help shape future citizens.

1.84 L.O. Todd’s Incomplete Speeches, 1956 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s incomplete speech “Education for All Children. Do We Mean It?” may have been for Marion Park Elementary School in Meridian. The last two pages are from what Joe Todd, L.O. Todd’s son, says are another PTA talk.

1.85 L.O. Todd’s Speech to Parents 8th Grade, 17-18 March 1958 

Scope and Content

4pgs. L.O. Todd’s “Summary of Talk to Parents of Eighth Grades, Kate Griffin Junior High School” discusses with the parents the educational problems that confronted their children, the school’s program, and the various services available. Note on Original Folder: Unusual setup in Meridian at the time. Junior high was 8th, 9th, and 10th grades. High school – 11th and 12th were part of junior college.

1.86 L.O. Todd Speech to Meridian Junior College, 12 December 1958 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s shorthand version of the speech to Meridian Junior College. He claims the subject of the speech is equality. Note on Original Folder: The speech was delivered the year after Sputnik. The note scribbled top left corner is L.O. Todd’s handwriting.

1.87 L.O. Todd Speech, 1958 

Scope and Content

11pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “After Reorganization, an Improved Educational Program” to an unnamed audience, most likely to the teachers of Meridian. Joe Todd, L.O. Todd’s son, has written a note at the bottom of the first page to provide some background. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd Scholarly Speech. No Audience noted but probably Meridian Faculty. No date attached, but on first page he mentions Mr. Neill McElroy, the President of Procter and Gamble, on leave to be Secretary of Defense in the Eisenhower administration receiving an honorary degree and giving the Commencement address at Harvard the week before. It had to be 1958. L.O. Todd and my mother were there to see me become a M.D. that day.

1.88 L.O. Todd’s Letters to Wall Street Journal Editor, 2 March 1959 and 14 February 1961 

Scope and Content

6pgs. L.O. Todd wrote two published letters to the editor of the Wall Street Journal. “The Education Battle: Readers” discusses the quality of students’s education as well as to the quality of teachers in Mississippi. “Education in the Marketplace” discusses the quality of educational programs in Mississippi. Folder also includes a letter from Aileen Smith from the United States Committee for UNICEF praising the February letter.

1.89 L.O. Todd’s speech to MS Petroleum Association, 27 May 1959 

Scope and Content

7pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “The Business Man’s Responsibility to Education” to the annual meeting of the Mississippi Petroleum Association in Jackson, Mississippi. Note on Original Folder: A very enlightened speech about education to businessmen convention.

1.90 L.O. Todd’s Speech to State Convention, 9 April 1960 

Scope and Content

12pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Strengthening Our Education” for the State Convention Delta Kappa Gamma. The speech discusses the education of teachers. Notes and outline by L.O. Todd at the end of the speech.

1.91 L.O. Todd Speech Notecards 1960-1971 

Scope and Content

32pgs. L.O. Todd notecards for graduation, radio, and television speeches. Speech topics included education, promoting adult education, retirement, and Cold War.

1.92 History of the Mississippi Education Association Dissertation, June 1961 

Scope and Content

341pgs. Copy of Lewis William Godlove’s dissertation “A History of the Mississippi Education Association” presented and defended at the University of Mississippi for his doctorate of education. Pages 227-254 discuss the legislature sessions and the Problems and Policies Commission. Pages 269-272 discuss several of the changes and laws that L.O. Todd and others helped put into place for education, teachers, and schools.

1.93 L.O. Todd’s Introduction and Turner Catledge’s Speech at SACS, 3 December 1963 

Scope and Content

18pgs. 18pgs. L.O. Todd introduces his friend Turner Catledge. Catledge, the managing editor of The New York Times, was a native of Philadelphia, MS. Catledge’s speech at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools in Memphis, Tennessee. Note on Original Folder: 1) Turner Catledge Speech at SACS – Memphis Dec. 3, 1963 2) L.O. Todd – Introduction. Note inside the folder on Catledge’s speech – Bill Brasfield, President of SACS was superintendent of Philadelphia, MS schools following L.O. Todd (1940s).

1.94 L.O. Todd Soviet Union Trip, 1963-1964 

Scope and Content

19pgs. L.O. Todd’s invitation, registration form, and itinerary for his study mission to Soviet Russia from March 13 – April 14, 1964. He was part of a select group of administrators that planned to examine the Soviet Union’s curriculum, standards of achievement, methods, organizational patterns, and administrative techniques. The American Association of School Administrators invited him and helped organize the trip.

1.95 Soviet Education and the New Soviet Man, February 1962 

Scope and Content

60pgs. Copy of “Soviet Education and the New Soviet Man” by Richard L. Renfield from the Committee on International Relations by the National Education Association. This book, tracing the development of the Soviet education system from its founding in 1917, was issued as preliminary information to the delegates in this mission.

1.96 Newsweek Article and Russian Alphabet, 1963 

Scope and Content

8pgs. Newsweek article “World in Change: A Trip Through Eastern Europe” discusses interviews secretly taken by their European correspondent. Folder also contains a copy of the Russian alphabet.

1.97 Soviet Propaganda for Young Children, 1957 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Copy of propaganda and fabricated stories concerning American life that was being taught to children of the Soviet Union. This copy contains small stories and poems in English that children in the Soviet Union would have to translate into Russian. Titles of these short stories and poems include “Henry Ford’s Inferno,” “We Are Happy Children,” and “The Red Tie of the Pioneers.”

1.98 L.O. Todd's Trip to Russia in Context of the Cold War 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Dr. Joe Todd (Dr. L.O. Todd's son) provides some context of L.O. Todd's trip to Russia in the context of the Cold War.

1.99 Narrative Reports of USSR Education, 1964 

Scope and Content

66pgs. Individual narrative reports from the USA administrators group for the study of USSR education. L.O. Todd’s narrative report is about the Pioneer Palace in Leningrad, now St. Petersburg, on page 14.

1.101 Soviet Education Series, 1964 

Scope and Content

38pgs. Clarion Ledger and Meridian Star newspaper articles by L.O. Todd about Soviet Union’s education system. The School Administrator also has an article regarding L.O. Todd and the trip of the superintendents. The introduction of L.O. Todd is also included at the top of the first page and ends by saying L.O. Todd’s articles do not constitute approval of communist doctrines or practices.

1.101 Soviet Education Newspaper Articles by L.O. Todd, 1964 

Scope and Content

34pgs. Copies of 6 different articles that L.O. Todd wrote about Soviet education and his experience in the Soviet Union. He specifically discusses Leningrad's Pioneer Palaces and the Cold War.

1.102 East European Postcards, 1964 

Scope and Content

52pgs. Postcards from Berlin, France, Kiev, Warsaw, Prague, St. Petersburg, and Moscow. Folder also includes L.O. Todd’s passport.

1.103 L.O. Todd’s Letters and Notebook from USSR Trip, 1964 

Scope and Content

111pgs. L.O. Todd’s letters to his wife about his trip in the Soviet Union. Some letters are specifically from Leningrad, now St. Petersburg. His notebook has notes from Denmark, Finland, and Leningrad. L.O. Todd’s notebook’s first fifteen sheets are about Denmark, the next twenty two sheets are about Finland, the next seven pages are blank, and the final three pages are about Leningrad.

1.104 Newspaper Articles and Rotary about USSR, 1964 

Scope and Content

8pgs. Newspaper articles about L.O. Todd’s trip and the Soviet Union’s education system. A letter from the Rotary Club to L.O. Todd. Notes in Folder: Tom-Tom E.C.J.C. –Decatur. Newton Record – Newton, MS. Hattiesburg American, May 13, 1964 – Rotary Club Speech. At Rotary Club he was introduced by his beloved older brother, Hiram Elby Todd, then the first vice president of First National Bank who according to L.O. Todd gave what was the longest public speech of his life. “The speaker today is my brother Lindsey who recently made a trip to Russia.” The complementary note is from Hiram Phenazee Todd, cousin of L.O. and Hiram E. The Rodney referred to in the note was Rodney Freeman, a Hattiesburg businessman who was also a 1st cousin. All four were born in Newton County.

1.105 Photos from USSR Trip, 1964 

Scope and Content

9pgs. Group photos from USSR trip in front of Kremlin, Kremlin churches, Lenin’s mausoleum, and St. Basil’s Cathedral.

1.106 Newspaper Articles and Report about USSR Trip, 1964 

Scope and Content

38pgs. Clarion Ledger and Meridian Star newspaper articles by L.O. Todd about Soviet Union’s education system. The School Administrator also has an article regarding L.O. Todd and the trip of the superintendents. The introduction of L.O. Todd is also included at the top of the first page and ends by saying L.O. Todd’s articles do not constitute approval of communist doctrines or practices.

1.107 Remarks by Francis Keppel at White House, 30-31 July 1964 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Photocopy of brief remarks by the U.S. Commissioner of Education Francis Keppel at the White House Meeting of School Superintendents. Washington Post wrote an article about the meeting. Keppel is in the article. Note on Original Folder: Goes with Desegregation. Part of remarks by Commissioner of Education, Francis Keppel, at White House meeting of School Superintendents, July 1964. Original is in the Todd Family Album. Western Union invitation and Lindsey’s picture with LBJ.

1.108 Introduction speech for L.O. Todd , 3 September 1965 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Unknown author and speaker of this introduction for L.O. Todd’s annual address to the teaching staff at Meridian Schools. The introductory speech praises L.O. Todd’s achievements for Meridian.

1.109 L.O. Todd’s address to first general faculty meeting, 3 September 1965 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at the first general faculty meeting for Meridian schools discusses desegregation. He articulates the quality of education must not be lessened due to desegregation; faculty, staff, and students need to treat all students the same; last, to not let any groups disrupt the climate for learning. Ends the addresses by emphasizing that the competence of the individual teacher in his or her classroom is of the utmost importance to helping the education of all students. The use of the words “first general” probably indicates faculty meeting in the desegregation process. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd’s address to general faculty meeting - Meridian. Sept. 3, 1965.

1.110 L.O. Todd’s address to general faculty meeting, 12 April 1966 

Scope and Content

14pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at the general faculty meeting for Meridian schools attempts to correct misunderstandings teachers heard regarding desegregation. The two main points of the plan of desegregation was students entering the desegregated system could choose where they wanted to attend school and all activities, programs, and facilities would be open without regard to race, color, or national origin. He attempts to address the fears of faculty members about their classrooms and students. Ends the speech by reinstating his and the school administration’s commitment to provide quality education in a conductive environment for all students. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd speech. General Faculty meeting, MPS. April 12, 1966.

1.111 Talk to Meeting of School Boards and Superintendents, 26 April 1966 

Scope and Content

9pgs. Copy L.O. Todd’s speech to the First District Meeting of School Board Members and Superintendents. Begins the speech by giving a small history of separate but equal ruling, Brown v. Board of Education ruling, and the Civil Rights Act. He then discusses the need to provide all students with support, resources, and a quality education, but now under the different circumstances of integration. He goes on to praise teachers in Mississippi schools on their high level of consideration and accommodation. Folder also contains a letter from Oktibbeha County Superintendent Thad E. Easterwood thanking L.O. Todd for the speech. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd’s talk to First District Meeting of School Board Members and Superintendents. 4/26/1966 at Mississippi State University.

1.112 Southern Education Report Magazine, January - February 1967 

Scope and Content

32pgs. Pages 20- 23, Southern Education Report Magazine contains the article “A Profile: Meridian’s L.O. Todd has a Junior College that’s for Everybody” about L.O. Todd.

1.113 L.O. Todd’s address at general faculty meeting, 1968 

Scope and Content

25pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at the general faculty meeting for Meridian schools discusses the conflicts between communism and the free world, racial conflict, and the conflict of affluent and poverty. He challenges teachers to help intervene in these in the classroom by making sure to help individual students and aid them in participation. A copy of a newspaper article “Todd Challenges Local Teachers” also discusses Todd’s speech at the faculty meeting. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation. L.O. Todd speech; general faculty meeting: MPS 1968.

1.114 “Meridian meets the Challenge of Change with IPI,” February 1969 

Scope and Content

2pgs. L.O. Todd’s article “Meridian meets the Challenge of Change with IPI” for Mississippi Educational Advance. The article discusses how teachers try to implement individually prescribed instruction or IPI. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd article in MS Education Advance MEA Journal. Feb 1969 “Individually Prescribed Instruction.”

1.115 L.O. Todd’s Comments to Meridian Teacher Association, 5 March 1969 

Scope and Content

14pgs. L.O. Todd’s comments to Meridian Teacher Association discuss the successes of the school year. He also discusses the professional relationships between teachers and students during desegregation.

1.116 L.O. Todd’s Speech for Kirby P. Walker, 24 June 1969 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech honoring Kirby P. Walker, retiring superintendent of schools of Jackson Municipal Separate School District, at the annual meeting of the Council of Public School Systems. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd’s comments on Kirby P. Walker given at annual meeting of Council of Public School Systems. June 24, 1969.

1.117 L.O. Todd’s speech at pre-school workshop, 26 August 1969 

Scope and Content

16pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at pre-school workshop for Meridian. He discusses the first attempts at desegregation and claims the court ordered it to be done in too short of a time period and the plan by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare was not good for the students. Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Mr. Finch, told a court to disregard his department’s plans and to implement the ones created by L.O. Todd and other school administrators. He states and underlines racist is “our greatest problem” and attempts to calm the fears of teachers. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd’s speech pre-school workshop, MPS. 8/26/1969.

1.118 Letter to Mr. Robert H. Finch, 4 September 1969 

Scope and Content

2pgs. L.O. Todd’s letter to Mr. Robert H. Finch, the Secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. He thanks the secretary for adequate time for schools to develop desegregation plans. L.O. Todd ends the letter by saying that he is personally committed to the elimination of the dual school system. Note on Original Folder: Integration – Desegregation. L.O. Todd letter to Sec. Finch (HEW). Sept. 4, 1969.

1.119 Miami Herald article, 2 November 1969 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Clippings of the Miami Herald article, “Bell to Toll for Mississippi Public Schools?” discussing desegregation. Duncan Gray, a Meridian Episcopal priest, is quoted in the article and mentions his 10th grade son (Lloyd Gray).

1.120 U.S. News & World Report article, 8 December 1969 

Scope and Content

103pgs. Copy of the December 1969 issue of U.S. News & World Report magazine. On page 24, L.O. Todd is featured in the article “Chaos in Public Schools – The Mississippi Story.” Kirby Walker sent L.O. Todd a small postcard chiding Todd about his language in the article. The managing editor sent L.O. Todd a letter assuring him he had no intention of misquoting or misrepresenting Todd’s language or position. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation. U.S. News & World Report – December 8, 1969. “Chaos in Public School” – The MS. Story. Enclosed – card to L.O. Todd from his closest education friend Kirby Walker chiding Lindsey for his mild profanity in the article.

1.121 Mike Maples’s Letter to Meridian High School, 22 December 1969 

Scope and Content

1pg. Copy of study body president Mike Maples’s letter to fellow students at Meridian High School calling for students to make the best of the opportunity afforded them during desegregation. Note on Original Folder: Letter to fellow students at Meridian High School from Mike Maples, the student body president. Dec. 22, 1969. Big chances were to occur for early 1970.

1.122 L.O. Todd’s speech to local PTA, 1969 

Scope and Content

8pgs. A copy of L.O. Todd’s speech to a local PTA to show the individual differences among students in the Meridian District and to explain the activities, curriculum, and other services provided to accommodate and provide for these individual differences. Note on Folder L.O. Todd speech to local PTA – 1969.

1.123 Letters of Commendation for TV, January 1970 

Scope and Content

4pgs. Four letters sent to L.O. Todd about his television program about the education in the Meridian public schools. Three letters from Mississippi State College for Women, Starkville Public Schools, and Aberdeen Public Schools praise L.O. Todd and Meridian schools. The letter from the University of Southern Mississippi dean of the College of Education and Psychology. He wrote his regrets on being unable to watch the program but said he has heard mostly favorable remarks about it.

1.124 WTOK-TV Television Programs, January 1970 

Scope and Content

37pgs. Three television programs from WTOK-TV from January 1970. The television programs all stress that the quality of education would be maintained and that all children would be treated equally.

1.125 Comments about TV Program from Mayor Key, January 1970 

Scope and Content

2pgs. A copy of Mayor Al Key’s statement about L.O. Todd’s television program about integration and education at public schools in Meridian. Note on Original Folder: Yes, one of the famous Key brothers.

1.126 Lloyd Gray Letter, 8 January 1970 

Scope and Content

1pg. A copy of a letter Lloyd Gray, Duncan’s son, wrote to his fellow 10th graders about desegregation.

1.127 Birmingham Kiwanis Club Speech, 3 February 1970 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech discusses the desegregation process in Meridian. He discusses the difficulty of coming up with a plan for integration in such a short period of time that was ordered by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals on July 2, 1969. He discusses his use of television and WTOK-TV’s programs in helping ease tensions and fears in Meridian. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation Speech Kiwanis Club in Birmingham. Feb 3, 1970.

1.128 “Realism and the Schools” newspaper article, 8 February 1970 

Scope and Content

3pgs. 3 copies of The Birmingham News article “Realism and the Schools” which discusses L.O. Todd’s visit at the Kiwanis Club.

1.129 Meridian Star article “Blacks Picket in City”, 21 April 1970 

Scope and Content

1pg. Meridian Star article “Blacks Picket in City” discusses how approximately 25 African American students picketed at Harris schools and administration offices with signs asking for a negotiation and discussion of grievances. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation - Boycott - Meridian schools - April 1970.

1.130 L.O. Todd’s speech at a general faculty meeting, 12 May 1970 

Scope and Content

12pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech at a general faculty meeting for Meridian schools. He praises his teachers for their composure during integration. However, he also says the district is not sure how many teachers they will be able to take into the next year and says there are continuing negations with the legislature. He concludes the speech by saying that there needs to be unity in the school system and staff. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd speech; general faculty meeting: MPS. May 12, 1970.

1.131 Statewide Conference for School Administrators Speech, 3 - 5 June 1970 

Scope and Content

17pgs. Copy of L.O. Todd’s speech “A Positive Approach to School Desegregation” discusses the problems of integration in Meridian. He describes initial programs for integration. He then details that it was the amount of students and the short amount of time these students had to be integrated was a problem. Meridian was unique because they used television to describe the buildings, the students, and the curriculum of the schools. Ends the speech claiming that by September, Mississippi will be the most integrated state in the nation. Folder also contains a copy of the program of the conference.

1.132 L.O. Todd Speech to Rotary Club 31, August 1970 

Scope and Content

12pgs. Copy of L.O. Todd’s talk to the Rotary Club in Meridian, Mississippi that discusses the financial need of the school districts in Mississippi and Meridian. Clipping of an unknown newspaper, most likely the Meridian Star, article titled “Need Stressed for Support.”

1.133 Meridian Star articles praise L.O. Todd, 3 September 1970 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Two Meridian Star articles praise L.O. Todd and other teachers in Meridian integration. The article “Todd Cites School ‘Challenge’” discusses how L.O. Todd emphasized it was necessary for good order and good relations in and out of the classroom. The article “Parent Praises Dr. Todd, City Schools” is a letter to the editor. It was written by a parent and discusses how she is calm about integration due to L.O. Todd, his staff, and the teachers. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation. School Integration Items

1.134 L.O. Todd’s talks to faculty, 2 and 8 September 1970 

Scope and Content

9pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Talk to Faculty” discusses school integration. He praises the teachers and administrators as well as their strategies in their classrooms, methods, and techniques. He also stresses that teachers and administrators cannot treat the students differently. L.O. Todd’s unnamed speech discusses plans for integration. He praises his teachers, training, and their preparation. He ends the speech on an optimistic note about the school year. Note on Original Folder: Sept. 1970. L.O. Todd speeches.

1.135 L.O. Todd Address “A Brief Overview,” 19 October 1970 

Scope and Content

32pgs. Copy L.O. Todd’s address “A Brief Overview” to the Mississippi Association of School Administrators. He was one of the founders of the organization. His overview of the founding was presented in 1971, forty years after the founding. He was the second president of the organization. Included is L.O. Todd’s president certificate from 1932-1933 and the program of the 1932-1933 convention.

1.136 Reuben Griffith’s Retirement, 24 November 1970 

Scope and Content

10pgs. Correspondence between L.O. Todd and Reuben Griffith. A Thank you note from W.S. Griffin to L.O. Todd. L.O. Todd’s speech at the retirement dinner for Reuben Griffith. Program from Reuben W. Griffith’s retirement dinner. Note on Original Folder: Remarks Honoring Reuben Griffith.

1.137 Meridian Star and Clarion Ledge articles, 30 June 1970 and 21 December 1970 

Scope and Content

3pgs. Meridian Star article “Schools in Federal Court: Plan ‘Best of Overall’ For City… Dr. Todd” discusses exchanges between Dr. L.O. Todd and NAACP in federal court over final desegregation plan. Clarion Ledge article “School Officials Tell of Troubles, Costs” discusses how Meridian public school officials told state legislators and the Chamber of Commerce Education Committee that more funds were needed to alleviate problems of integration. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation – 1970. Two Newspaper Columns – 1970. 1. June 1, 1970 – Meridian Star (Jean Perry column) regarding final desegregation plan. 2. December 21, 1970 Clarion Ledger column – L.O. Todd and Paul Franklin tell legislation committee and State Chamber of Commerce Education Committee the added cost from implementing the final integration plan.

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Box 2 

2.1 “Landmark School Desegregation Court Decisions” Booklet, 1970- 1971 

Scope and Content

15pgs. The booklet, “Landmark School Desegregation Court Decisions,” addressed to Dr. Todd that aims to provide a condensed review of some of the developments of major significance to the area of law dealing with school desegregation by Mississippi Educational Services Center, Division of General Extension, Mississippi State University, State College, Mississippi. Note on Original Folder: Desegregation. Interesting. Summary of “Landmark School Desegregation Court Decisions” circa 1970-1971. Complied and distributed 1970 – 1971 in approaching 75th anniversary of Plessy vs. Ferguson 1896.

2.2 L.O. Todd’s Speech to USM, 9 - 11 February 1971 

Scope and Content

13pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Purposes and Values of School Improvement” to the University of Southern Mississippi. Note on Original Folder: MSCW February 11, 1971 and Southern Association.

2.3 L.O. Todd’s letter to the editor of Memo Digest, 5 May 1971 

Scope and Content

1pg. L.O. Todd’s letter to the editor “Readers Write” in Memo Digest calls for unity of the African American and white community. He begins the article by saying that the people of Mississippi rise and fall together regardless of their ethnic group. He concludes the article with a quote from an African American student saying that “If we will learn to behave ourselves, we will have it made.” He also briefly discusses the performance of African American teachers and students. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd letter to editor of Memo Digest - Bernice note indicated this was a Black publication as evident by notes on back - regarding school and people in Philadelphia and Neshoba county.

2.4 Clarion Ledger articles on Retirement Ceremony, 19 May 1971 

Scope and Content

5pgs. Clarion Ledger newspaper articles about L.O. Todd’s retirement ceremony.

2.5 Meridian Star article on retirement, 28 May 1971 

Scope and Content

1pg. Meridian Star article about L.O. Todd’s retirement.

2.6 L.O. Todd Commencement Speech at ECJC, 28 May 1971 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s commencement speech at the East Central Junior College. Note on Original Folder: Address at ECJC at approximate date of his final retirement at Meridian. Probably his best speech and needs to be in ECJC archive.

2.7 L.O. Todd Retirement Ceremony, May 1971 

Scope and Content

25pgs. Several items including speeches, programs, and poems relating honoring L.O. Todd for his retirement ceremony.

2.8 Kate Griffin Junior High School Letter, 2 June 1971 

Scope and Content

2pgs. Copy of a letter to L.O. Todd from Kate Griffin Junior High School Principal Carlos G. Corley detailing some of the students’s efforts during the 1970-1971 school year to help the process of integration at their school. Note on Original Folder: Outstanding June 2, 1971 letter to L.O. Todd from principal of Kate Griffin Junior High School - illustrates the concerted effort of student body of a key school to make the total integration process a success.

2.9 Junior College Recognition Dinner Speech, 15 June 1971 

Scope and Content

11pgs. Jimmie Ewing discusses several of the accomplishments by many of the dinner guests. He also discusses the importance of the junior colleges and their curriculums. Note on Original Folder: Address by Jimmie Ewing, President of Delta State University at the time; Review Hx of MS. Community colleges. L.O. Todd mentioned in second sentence, middle of page 6, and top of pg. 8. These two were the friendliest of friends and the fiercest of rivals. They needed each other – you just had to wait for the smoke to clear sometimes.

2.10 L.O. Todd's speech to the National Academy for School Executives, 23 June 1971 

Scope and Content

32pgs. Copy of L.O. Todd’s speech discusses desegregation and integration tactics and approaches in Meridian to the National Academy of School Executives in Portland, Oregan. Opens the speech by saying he is unsure if Meridian has achieved a successful integration or if the National Academy for School Executives would accept their method of involving students. He also discusses some of the troubles of integration but remains optimistic.

2.11 L.O. Todd’s Memorandum to Board of Trustees, 29 June 1971 

Scope and Content

8pgs. Copy of L.O. Todd’s memorandum to the Board of Trustees of the Meridian Municipal Separate School District. He discusses the changes and improvements to the school district, including: 1) capital expenditures and building improvements, 2) annual expenditures, 3) cafeteria system, 4) business administration, 5) desegregation, 6) instructional administration, 7) development of central supervision for instruction, 8) in-service education, 9) salary schedule and personnel policies, 10) instructional evaluation instrument, 11) administrative manual, 12) public information, 13) Meridian Junior College, 14) Business Administration, 15) Instruction.

2.12 Southern Association Colleges and Schools Honorary Life Membership, November - December 1971 

Scope and Content

15pgs. Correspondence, recognition, and newspaper articles between the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and L.O. Todd. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools awarded L.O. Todd with a honorary life membership.

2.13 AASA Distinguished Service Award, 13 February 1972 

Scope and Content

4pgs. The American Association of School Administrators awarded L.O. Todd the Distinguished Service Award, the highest award given by the organization.

2.14 AASA Distinguished Service Award, December 1971 – February 1972 

Scope and Content

16pgs. Folder contains parts of the correspondence, the program, and newspaper articles covering the American Association of School Administrators awarded L. O. Todd the Distinguished Service Award.

2.15 L.O. Todd’s article “Equality of Opportunity,” 1971 

Scope and Content

2pgs. L.O. Todd’s article “Equality of Opportunity: this was the year of the breakthrough” was published in Mississippi Educational Advance in May 1971. He reflects and discusses the challenges and positive aspects after the first full year of integration. Todd ends the article by mentioned how many pupils academically achieved at their normal rate or even achieved in 1970-1971. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd article in June 1971. MS. Ed. Advance (MEA Journal) Reflects his optimism after first complete year of integration plan.

2.16 Croft Leadership Action Folio, 1971 

Scope and Content

8pg. The copy of Croft Leadership Action Folio by Joseph Foote discussing desegregation and integration. Note on Original Folder: Integration – Desegregation Croft Leadership Action Folio by Joseph Foote. Published prior to L.O. Todd’s June 1971 retirement.

2.17 L.O. Todd’s letter to students in Wildcat, 1971 

Scope and Content

2pg. Copy of a letter L.O. Todd wrote to the students of Meridian High School and it was published in the school’s publication of Wildcat. He reflects on what students, parents, and faculty have learned from integration. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd letter to students published in Wildcat.

2.18 L.O. Todd’s speech to the AASA, 14 February 1972 

Scope and Content

6pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Our Segregated Society – Can Separation By Overcome?” discusses segregation and integration. Briefly addresses there have been more white private schools being built and public schools having more African American students. Ends the speech by demonstrating how race and inequality has affected African Americans in a few situations.

2.19 L.O. Todd at Memorial Lecture Series, 3-8 May 1972 

Scope and Content

33pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “In Pursuit of an Ideal” given at a Forrest W. Murphy Memorial Lecture Series in Education at the University of Mississippi. He discusses his reflections and reactions on education in Mississippi from 1921 to 1971. Jerry Robbins, the Chairman of the Department of Educational Administration, sent L.O. Todd a thank you letter and a notification that his speech would be published.

2.20 L.O. Todd’s Speech for Mr. W.A. Reed, Jr., 28 May 1972 

Scope and Content

4pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech to honor Mr. W.A. Reed, Jr. A small program in honor of Mr. W.A. Reed, Jr. is also included. W.A. Reed, Jr. was the highly regarded and long serving principal of Harris High School (the segregated African American high school in Meridian). Mrs. Jennie Ruth Crump was the highly regarded and long serving principal of the Wechsler Junior High School in Meridian. They were vital in the high quality of their schools and making the desegregation process successful.

2.21 L.O. Todd Speech for MS Association for School Superintendents, 27 July 1972 

Scope and Content

7pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Why One (Strong) Organization for Administrators?” was delivered to the Mississippi Association of School Superintendents. Note on Original Folder: This speech contains a lot of information, experience, history and advice. But the typing is poor, and with the many annotations scribbled in L.O. Todd’s horrible cursive, it is almost unreadable.

2.22 L.O. Todd’s Letter to Editor for Dr. H.M. Ivy , 11 October 1972 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s letter to editor of Educational Advance honoring Dr. H.M. Ivy. Dr. Ivy had been a member of the Mississippi Education Association for 67 years at the point of this letter. A small clipping from the Mississippi Education Association pictures Dr. H.M. Ivy, Dr. L.O. Todd, and Principal Robert Barrett. In the clipping, Dr. Ivy is being presented with the Distinguished Service Award, which is the Association of School Administrator’s highest award. The clipping is from 27 February 1973. Note on Original Folder: L.O. Todd’s letter to editor of Educational Advance CMEA publication. A great tribute to Dr. H.M. Ivy.

2.23 Kirby Walker’s Forest Murphy’s Memorial Lecture, 28 November 1972 

Scope and Content

19pgs. Copy of Kirby Walker’s Forest Murphy’s Memorial Lecture at the University of Mississippi that he sent to L.O. Todd. Note on Original Folder: Great Forest Murphy memorial lecture by Kirby Walker, long time fellow administrator with L.O. Todd. Kirby Walker was long time superintendant of Jackson Schools. He was smarter than most, but did not earn a PhD. He was a great tease and practical jokester – liked to get under his friends’s skin. He sent this copy to Todd with note at top “For L.O. Todd PhD etcetera. HLM SACS.” HLM – Honorary Lifetime Member. SACS – Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. Kirby also received the honor of being a honorary lifetime member for SACS.

2.24 L.O. Todd’s Seminar at AASA, 26 February 1973 

Scope and Content

8pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech “Were You and Your Spouse Ready for Retirement?” was prepared for seminar at American Association of School Administrators in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

2.25 L.O. Todd’s Speech for Dr. H.M. Ivy, 4-5 March 1973 

Scope and Content

6pgs. L.O. Todd’s speech honoring Dr. Ivy at Marion Park School. There is also program from the appreciation ceremony for Dr. Ivy. On 5 March 1973, the Meridian Star wrote a column dedicated to Dr. Ivy, L.O. Todd, and Clyde Muse. Note on Original Folder: Reception Honoring Dr. Ivy at Marion Park School. 1. L.O. Todd’s Talk. Please note that Dr. Ivy, L.O. Todd’s longtime (30yr) predecessor as Supt. Meridian School received the same coveted honor from the AASA in 1973 that Lindsey had received in 1972. Lindsey probably told them that Dr. Ivy was at least just as worthy and he was still alive. 2. Program. 3. March 5 Meridian Star column and photo, Dr. Ivy, L.O. Todd, Clyde Muse. Clyde Muse followed L.O. Todd at Meridian and then went to Hinds Community College about 1980 and still at that job in 2016. Adds up to a combined 97 years that these three men have been chief administrator at a MS community college.

2.26 L.O. Todd Northwest Junior College Commencement Address, 6 May 1973 

Scope and Content

5pgs. L.O. Todd’s Northwest Junior College Commencement address. L.O. Todd’s handwritten notes at the end of the speech.

2.27 L.O. Todd Last Speech, 15-18 June 1973 

Scope and Content

24pgs. L.O. Todd’s tribute to Fred. W. Young, given 5 days before L.O. Todd’s death. He wrote a letter and enclosed the speech to Mr. Young’s children and grandchildren that was written 2 days before L.O. Todd’s death. L.O. Todd died on 20 June 1973. Note on Original Folder: The typing and quality of copy is of poor quality. The talk by L.O. Todd was part of a “case study” of how administrator could react to certain type of individual. Evidently other administrator participated. L.O. Todd’s part is basically a tribute or eulogy to his long time co-educator Fred Young. L.O. Todd had just returned from a trip to England, a few days before this presentation in Biloxi. This may explain the poor typing and what the program was about. June 18 1973 – letter to children and g. children of Fred W. Young with copy of address he had given featuring his great friend Mr. Young on June 15 L.O. Todd died suddenly June 20.

2.28 L.O. Todd Obituary and In Memoriam, June - October 1973 

Scope and Content

23pgs. L.O. Todd’s obituary and funeral program. Several associations, schools, and the city of Meridian wrote memoriam for L.O. Todd.

2.29 Rotary Club, 2 July 1973 

Scope and Content

4pgs. The Meridian Rotary Club note commented on how L.O. Todd served the Rotary well and mentions other clubs where he was a member throughout the years. Two newspaper clippings about L.O. Todd being elected as Rotary’s president.

2.30 L.O. Todd Library Dedication, September 1973 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Program, newspaper articles, and resolution for the dedication of the L.O. Todd Library at the Meridian Junior College. Folder also contains letter from Mississippi Senator John C. Stennis and from John D. Williams.

2.31 L.O. Todd Tribute Letters, 1973 

Scope and Content

18pgs. Letters from other superintendents, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, universities, and individuals to Mrs. Todd discussing L.O. Todd and honoring his memory.

2.32 Chicago Tribune article “The South did it,” 10 June 1976 

Scope and Content

5pgs. Three copies of the Chicago Tribune article “The South did it: beat the North to integration” does not fondly discuss L.O. Todd. The reporter described L.O. Todd as “crusty.” The article claims a study by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare shows the south had the best record of school integration of the nation’s five regions. Note on Original Folder: Chicago Tribute 6/30/1976 - 3 years after L.O. Todd’s death.

2.33 Newspaper Clippings honoring L.O. Todd, 1971 - 2006 

Scope and Content

13pgs. Various newspaper clippings honoring L.O. Todd from different newspapers.

2.34 Educational Concepts, Not Dated 

Scope and Content

7pgs. Not dated. Copy of L.O. Todd’s educational concepts.

2.35 L.O. Todd Miscellaneous Material, 1940 - 1972 

Scope and Content

84 pgs. Miscellaneous L.O. Todd material. Correspondence between various associations and persons. There is an unnamed speech discussing how an outside consultant gave suggestions to help improve Meridian public schools. A small booklet “Handbook for Teachers Meridian Public Schools” contains a letter of welcome by L.O. Todd on page 4.

2.36 Bernice Todd, 1903-2017 

Scope and Content

44 pgs. Bernice Day Todd (1903 – 1993) was L.O. Todd’s wife. In the summer of 1965, at the age of 61, she wrote a compelling story of her life from early childhood until her marriage at age 26 (September 1929). There are copies of photographs, telegrams, and newspaper articles about her and Dr. Todd, and the dedication of the L.O. Todd Library at Meridian’s community college.

2.37 Mrs. Jennie Ruth Crump, 15 September 1980 and 23 March 1988 

Scope and Content

6pgs. A biography of Mrs. Jennie Ruth Crump for an honoree dinner night in 1980. The Meridian Star wrote two columns dedicated to Mrs. Jennie Ruth Crump, one in 1980 and the other in 1988. A letter from Bernice Todd to her daughter recounting her tribute to Jennie Ruther Crump the previous day. Note on Original Folder: Mrs. Jennie Ruth Crump. 1.Honor Night Dinner 1980. 2.Typed Tribute by Bernice Day Todd. 3.March 22, 1988 Meridian Star column about Jennie Ruth Crump.

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