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The Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy operate on both the Oxford and Jackson campuses. The Schools of Dentistry, Health Related Professionals and Medicine, and the Health Sciences Graduate School, are based in Jackson only. (Additional healthcare programs are available through the School of Applied Sciences on the Oxford campus.) Other than these exceptions, the schools above are on the Oxford campus.

Faculty Profile

Maureen Elizabeth Meyers

Sociology & Anthropology
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY
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560 LAMAR HALL
UNIVERSITY, MS 38677
(662) 915-7421
Joined UM: August 22, 2013

Areas of Expertise

  • ANTHROPOLOGY
  • ARCHAEOLOGY

Brief Bio

I am an archaeologist who has worked extensively in the Southeastern United States in both academic and cultural resource management settings. I received my Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Kentucky in 2011, after earning a M.A. degree in anthropology from the University of Georgia and a B.S. degree from Radford University. After receiving my master's degree, I taught for a year at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina, and then worked at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville; I also assisted with the University of Georgia excavations of the Mississippian period Lamar Mounds in central Georgia. In 1998 I began a career in cultural resource management, working as a Principal Investigator for The Louis Berger Group and later for Gray & Pape, Inc., in Richmond, Virginia. In 2004 I returned to graduate school to study Mississippian frontier chiefdoms in southwestern Virginia. My dissertation fieldwork was conducted at the fourteenth-century Carter Robinson mound site, and was supported by a National Geographic Exploration Fund grant. In 2013 I received the C.B. Moore Award for Excellence in Archaeology by a Young Scholar from the Southeastern Archaeological Conference. My primary area of research is Mississippian chiefdoms located on the periphery of the Mississippian cultural world. Specifically, I examine the role of craft production in the emergence of inequality within chiefdoms. Methodologically, I do this through the analysis of ceramic vessels and shell bead production items (beads, shell debris and lithic tools), as well as comparisons of domestic structures within and between sites. In addition to my Mississippian Period research I have done research on the Westos, a mid-seventeenth century Northeastern Native American group who initiated Indian slaving in the Southeast. As part of service to the discipline I have also overseen the creation and implementation of the Southeastern Archaeological Conference Sexual Harassment Survey, have served on the Society for American Archaeology Sexual Harassment Survey committee, and serve as a consultant on the National Park Service Sexual Harassment Survey.

Degrees

BS
Anthropology
RADFORD UNIVERSITY, RADFORD, VIRGINIA (1993)
MA
Anthropology
UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, ATHENS, GEORGIA (1995)
PhD
Anthropology
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY (2011)