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UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


The Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy operate on both the Oxford and Jackson campuses. The Schools of Dentistry, Health Related Professionals and Medicine, and the Health Sciences Graduate School, are based in Jackson only. (Additional healthcare programs are available through the School of Applied Sciences on the Oxford campus.) Other than these exceptions, the schools above are on the Oxford campus.

B.A. in Chemistry

Investigate the composition, properties and reactions of all substances.

There are two paths to study chemistry at the University of Mississippi. Choose between the Bachelor of Arts in Chemistry and the Bachelor of Science in Chemistry with an optional biochemistry emphasis. The B.A. degree allows greater compatibility with other areas of study while the more specialized B.S. degree requires more mathematics and science. The B.A. degree requires mathematics, physics, and chemistry courses such as organic, quantitative analysis, physical, and a senior research course.

Key Benefits

Study chemistry at the University of Mississippi to receive training in state-of-the-art chemical instrumentation, data collection and analyses, and professional presentation of scientific results. A high percentage of students also engage in research with faculty.

Graduate Outcomes

A liberal arts education prepares graduates to deal with complexity and change. They gain key skills in communication, problem-solving, and working with diverse groups. Related careers in chemistry include chemical and materials research, medical research, pharmacology, toxicology, health care, pharmacy, law, policy, and environmental areas.

Experiences Offered

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry is ranked among the top 50 chemistry departments in the country (out of 555) for its production of undergraduate degrees because faculty members take a keen interest in the success of their students. Students may become involved in research with faculty members as early as the end of their freshman year, and many opportunities exist for students to become involved in funded summer research projects.

B.A. in Chemistry Faculty

The faculty in the University of Mississippi's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry have expertise in analytical, astrochemistry, biological, computational, electrochemical, environmental, forensic, inorganic, organic, physical, and theoretical chemistry.

Saumen Chakraborty
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
James V Cizdziel
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Walter E Cleland
ASSOCIATE CHAIR AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Amal Antony Samy
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Steven R Davis
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Jared Heath Delcamp
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Ryan Clifton Fortenberry
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Murrell Godfrey
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF FORENSIC CHEMISTRY
Nathan I Hammer
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Charles L Hussey
ASSOCIATE DEAN FOR RESEARCH & GRADUATE EDUCATION AND PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Jonah Wesley Jurss
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Daniell L Mattern
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Susan Diane Pedigo
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Jason E Ritchie
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Gregory S Tschumper
CHAIR AND PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Randy Mack Wadkins
PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Davita Watkins
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Safo Aboaku
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
James M O'Neal
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSOCIATE PROF OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
Emily Bretherick Rowland
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Gerald Bobby Rowland
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
Kerri D Scott
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF FORENSIC CHEMISTRY
Ben Edward Smith
INSTRUCTOR AND ASSISTANT LABORATORY MANAGER
Liming Song-Cizdziel
INSTRUCTOR IN CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY
John Franklin Wiginton
INSTRUCTIONAL ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR AND DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE LABORATORIES
Yu-Dong Zhou
VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

A major in chemistry for the B.A. degree consists of the following 28-31 hours of courses: Chem 105, 106, 115, 116; 221, 222, 225, 226; 314; 331 or 334; 463 (1 hour), and two courses from 332, 401, 423, 469, 471. Two additional hours of Chem 463 may substitute for one of these courses. Math 261, 262 and Phys 211, 212, 221, 222 or Phys 213, 214, 223, 224 are also required. The following courses may not be used for major credit: Chem 101, 103, 104, 113, 114, 121, 201, 202, 271, 293, 381, 382, 383, or 393.

To enroll in the program, students must have successfully completed Chem 105 or have a minimum ACT mathematics score of 25 (SAT 580 or SATR 600).

Anna Hailey Rubinstein

Earning three majors in Chinese, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Anna (2011) was also a student in the Chinese Flagship Program. She was UM's 8th Goldwater Scholarship recipient. Anna worked in multiple research labs on the development of new photocatalysts for turning carbon dioxide into useable energy forms. She made a number of trips to China, including being UM's first exchange student at Zhejiang University, China's leading engineering school. She earned her M.A. in chemical engineering and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and materials science from Princeton University. Anna currently works at the Institute for Defense Analyses, a federally funded research and development center in Alexandria, VA. Her career goals are to work in the science and technology sector in support of the national defense industry.
Why study chemistry at UM?
"Students should consider coming to UM to study chemistry for the personalized experience. Class sizes are small, and professors really care about teaching and supporting each student. There are plenty of opportunities for undergraduate research, which is great preparation for graduate school or industry work."

Student Organizations

Join the American Chemical Society and/or the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers.