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UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES


The Schools of Nursing and Pharmacy operate on both the Oxford and Jackson campuses. The Schools of Dentistry, Health Related Professionals and Medicine, and the Health Sciences Graduate School, are based in Jackson only. (Additional healthcare programs are available through the School of Applied Sciences on the Oxford campus.) Other than these exceptions, the schools above are on the Oxford campus.

B.A. in Southern Studies

Seek to understand the American South in all of its complexity.

Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi is an interdisciplinary major, with students taking classes from across the College of Liberal Arts, including African American Studies, anthropology, art, English, gender studies, history, music, political science, and sociology. A senior seminar with an in-depth research project is a capstone experience for the major.

Key Benefits

For Southern Studies majors, the laboratory is all around them. Students not only conduct library research but also oral histories, take photographs, listen to music, and consider ways to understand Southern life. They gain a broad understanding of the region and skills in critical reading, analysis, writing, research, and oral presentation. The Center for the Study of Southern Culture greatly enhances the student experience.

Graduate Outcomes

A liberal arts education prepares graduates to deal with complexity and change. They gain key skills in communication, problem-solving, and working with diverse groups. Related careers in Southern Studies include education, archivist, journalist, cultural affairs officer, arts promoter, museum program specialist, teacher, documentary filmmaker, policy analyst, social worker, urban planning, writer, fundraising, health services, and human resources.

Experiences Offered

Students enrolled in the Southern Studies program enjoy getting involved in the activities of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, such as the Southern Foodways Alliance, Southern Documentary Project, the Oxford Conference for the Book, and Living Blues magazine.

B.A. in Southern Studies Faculty

Nearly 50 faculty members from across the University of Mississippi are affiliated with and provide courses that support the major. Of those, 11 hold a joint appointment in another department such as English, History, and Sociology & Anthropology, and are listed below.

Simone P Delerme
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY AND MCMULLAN ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOUTHERN STUDIES
Bruce O'Brian Foster
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOCIOLOGY & SOUTHERN STUDIES
Darren E Grem
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF UNITED STATES SOUTH HISTORY
Adam Stefan Gussow
PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND SOUTHERN STUDIES
Andrew C Harper
DIRECTOR OF MEDIA & DOCUMENTARY PROJECTS AND INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOUTHERN STUDIES & JOURNALISM
Kathryn B McKee
MCMULLAN ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF SOUTHERN STUDIES AND ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH
Ted M Ownby
DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF SOUTHERN CULTURE AND WILLIAM F WINTER PROFESSOR OF HISTORY
Catarina Passidomo Townes
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOUTHERN STUDIES AND ANTHROPOLOGY
Jodi Skipper
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY
David Wharton
DIRECTOR OF DOCUMENTARY STUDIES AND ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF SOUTHERN STUDIES
Jessica C Wilkerson
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF HISTORY & SOUTHERN STUDIES

A major in Southern studies for the B.A. degree consists of 42 hours of courses divided among a minimum of four departments. Students must take S St 101, 102, 301, 401, 402, and two courses from Hst 422, 450, 451, 452, 455, or Eng 354. Students must take 21 hours from the following list of courses: African American Studies (AAS 201, 202, 302, 308, 310, 316, 320, 325, 326, 334, 337, 341, 342, 386, 395, 413, 414, 420, 421, 438, 440, 441, 443, 504, 517, 518, 593); Art (AH 366, 369, 386); Economics (Econ 453); English (Eng 314, 357, 361, 362, 367, 354, 374, 479, 468, 460, 414, 458, 514); Gender Studies (G St 310, 418, 454); History (Hst 404, 414, 415, 418, 420, 422, 423, 440, 452, 453, 454, 455); Journalism (Jour 513); Music (Mus 321, 517, 518, 577); Political Science (Pol 307, 317, 318, 320); Sociology and Anthropology (Soc 315, 334, 351, 413, Anth 309, 315, 317, 319, 334, 337); and Southern Studies. Two areas of concentration also are acceptable as Southern studies majors: (1) A history concentration of S St 101, 102, 401, and 402; 21 hours chosen from the history courses listed above; and 9 additional hours selected from other courses listed above; (2) a 45-hour fine and performing arts concentration of S St 101, 102, 401, and 402, Thea 306 and 521, AH 349, 350, and 338 or 348, Mus 317, 318, and 321, and 9 additional hours selected from other courses listed above.

Admission requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in Southern Studies degree program are the same as the general undergraduate admission requirements.

Neal McMillin

Neal (B.A. in Economics and Southern Studies, 2014) spent time in Scotland learning about the emerging marine renewable industry, resulting in a thesis about the community and environmental impacts of wave and tidal energy development. After an honors course on the lower Mississippi River system, he pursued a Master's in marine affairs at the University of Washington. He later accepted the John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship in Washington, D.C., where he joined Senator Wicker's staff to promote Mississippi ocean policy. Later promoted to Legislative Assistant, Neal also covers issues related to the Department of Interior. He plans to one day return to the South as a leader in environmental policy.

Why Southern Studies at UM?
"Southern Studies majors explore the South, and America as a whole, from many different angles. The wide range of classes are meaningful and intriguing. You can sample diverse disciplines and craft a personalized path forward. The faculty gave me the freedom to explore and design a thesis that was impactful to my future. My thesis on marine renewables industry set me apart from my colleagues and led me to a marine focus in my policy degree. This experience prepared me to lead Senator Wicker's environmental policy with a local and international perspective."